Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Helpful Hints Appreciated...

I am at home today.  The weather outside pretty much is less than wonderful.  I am doing my best to house train our new dog, Chynna (ch-eye-nuh).She is about one year old and we adopted her from a local vet.  I know I need patience, but going from "never been soiled" carpet to accidents from our new furry animal family member is trying me greatly.  As I said, it is raining outside and I took her outside 30 minutes after  she ate her morning meal and "nothing!"  Why will she not "do her business" even when the grass is wet?



We do put her in a crate when we leave the house.  She gets to go out quite often, but she seems to enjoy soiling my art studio floor.  I hate to gate the access because she may choose another area of the house.  I really would like some pointers.  I asked a friend via Facebook and he told me to be patient and reward her with sugar cubes when she does go potty outside.  So, with this said...do you have any pointers for me?  Is there some special trick?  I have read ideas online but I am wondering how long this process will take?  

Your attention to this little matter is greatly appreciated!


5 comments:

Susan Dobson said...

When we were training our small dog, she stayed tethered to something or was crated 24/7 for about her 1st year. She was never allowed to roam the house. Most of the time she was tethered to her crate which is in the kitchen where we were most of the time or I tethered her to my belt loop. The ONLY time she was allowed off/out was if we were sitting in the family room and she had to be in our sight at all times.
It was very tedious and we all hated it, but I always knew where she was and it seemed to work for us.

All that to say that she still did have accidents and still does to this day. However, it is usually when we are not taking the time for her to do her business. She takes a LONG time to do her doo. Oh, and we now keep all doors closed to the other rooms (bedrooms have carpet)so that her accidents are limited to a few places and are easily found. Don't know if it will help for you but it might be worth trying.

Barbara Cale said...

Clay and I would take Casey out every hour - we would make him sit at the door and then we would take him out...now when he needs to go out, he will go and sit in front of the door....this will take some time, but it has worked out well for us.

Barbara and Clay

Amy Coose said...

Like Susan, we keep our dog off the carpeted areas and did from day one. We started with a small area gated off, and slowly gave her more freedom as she got better with accidents. It took a few months, but she is awesome now and has no accidents. Also, tell her to go potty when you take her out and if she does, say "good potty" so she learns what that means. I tell our dog to go tinkle and she goes right into the grass an takes care of business. Hope she gets better soon!

eddieross said...

Chynna is so cute! Congratulations on the new addition! Hope you're doing well.
xo E + J

Check out our recent post for a fun Valentine's Day dessert idea for your sweetie!
eddieross.com

Erica said...

The smaller the space she has access to the better. Believe it or not she really doesn't want to mess/soil where she lives but free roam of the house is too much. That is why I love crate training- most dogs will not mess in there crate- so kudos for crating her while you are away. Now for while you are home- limiting her space is key. The "umbilical cord method" that Susan Dobson mentioned works great. Having her teethered to you ensures she is with you and can't sneak off to another room, do her mess and then come back to you as if nothing happened. Also keeping to a schedule is important- first thing when she wakes up, a few minutes or so after eating and every 2-3 hours through the day. Set feedings, so you know when she east and therefore when she then needs to go out is important too. Hope this helps some. Here is a link re: training an adult dog http://www.petplace.com/dogs/how-to-house-train-your-adult-dog/page1.aspx